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The Great Gatsby: Daisy Buchanan | SparkNotes

Eventually, Gatsby won Daisy’s heart, and they made love before Gatsby left to fight in the war. Daisy promised to wait for Gatsby, but in 1919 she chose instead to marry Tom Buchanan, a young man from a solid, aristocratic family who could promise her a wealthy lifestyle and who had the support of her parents.

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The Great Gatsby: Study Guide | SparkNotes

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 Jazz Age novel about the impossibility of recapturing the past, was initially a failure. Today, the story of Gatsby’s doomed love for the unattainable Daisy is considered a defining novel of the 20th century. Explore a character analysis of Gatsby, plot summary, and important quotes.

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The Great Gatsby Chapter 9 Summary & Analysis | LitCharts

Gatsby's funeral takes place the next day. In an effort to assemble more people to attend the service, Nick goes to New York to try to retrieve Wolfsheim in person. At his sketchy office, Wolfsheim discusses memories of his early days of friendship with Gatsby, whom he claims to have raised up "out of nothing."

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The Great Gatsby: Themes | SparkNotes

SparkNotes Plus subscription is $4.99/month or $24.99/year as selected above. The free trial period is the first 7 days of your subscription. ... The ideals of love and marriage are profoundly strained in The Great Gatsby, a book that centers on two loveless marriages: the union between Tom and Daisy Buchanan and between George and Myrtle ...

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The Great Gatsby: Full Book Summary | SparkNotes

Gatsby’s extravagant lifestyle and wild parties are simply an attempt to impress Daisy. Gatsby now wants Nick to arrange a reunion between himself and Daisy, but he is afraid that Daisy will refuse to see him if she knows that he still loves her. Nick invites Daisy to have tea at his house, without telling her that Gatsby will also be there.

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The Great Gatsby Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis | SparkNotes

Summary. The narrator of The Great Gatsby is a young man from Minnesota named Nick Carraway.He not only narrates the story but casts himself as the book’s author. He begins by commenting on himself, stating that he learned from his father to reserve judgment about other people, because if he holds them up to his own moral standards, he will misunderstand them.

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The Great Gatsby: Daisy Buchanan Quotes | SparkNotes

These are Daisy’s first words in the book, spoken in Chapter 1 to Nick upon his arrival at the Buchanan residence. Preceded by what Nick describes as “an absurd, charming little laugh,” Daisy’s affected but playful stutter suggests that she is a constant performer in social situations.

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The Great Gatsby Chapter 6 Summary & Analysis | SparkNotes

A summary of Chapter 6 in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Great Gatsby and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

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The Great Gatsby Chapter 3 Summary & Analysis | LitCharts

After saying goodbye to Gatsby (who has to run off to receive a phone call from Philadelphia), Nick leaves the party. As he walks home, he sees a crowd gathered around an automobile accident. A drunken man has driven his new car into a ditch, with Owl Eyes in the passenger seat. The car is now missing a tire, but the driver nevertheless tries to reverse out of the ditch.

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The Great Gatsby: Setting | SparkNotes

The action of The Great Gatsby takes place along a corridor stretching from New York City to the suburbs known as West and East Egg. West and East Egg serve as stand-ins for the real-life locations of two peninsulas along the northern shore of Long Island. Midway between the Eggs and Manhattan lies the “valley of ashes,” where Myrtle and George Wilson have a run-down garage.

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The Great Gatsby: Jay Gatsby | SparkNotes

The title character of The Great Gatsby is a young man, around thirty years old, who rose from an impoverished childhood in rural North Dakota to become fabulously wealthy. However, he achieved this lofty goal by participating in organized crime, including distributing illegal alcohol and trading in stolen securities.

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The Eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg Symbol in The Great Gatsby - LitCharts

The eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg on the billboard overlooking the Valley of Ashes represent many things at once: to Nick they seem to symbolize the haunting waste of the past, which lingers on though it is irretrievably vanished, much like Dr. Eckleburg's medical practice. The eyes can also be linked to Gatsby, whose own eyes, once described as "vacant," often stare out, blankly keeping ...

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The Great Gatsby: Important Quotes Explained | SparkNotes

In Chapter 6, when Nick finally describes Gatsby’s early history, he uses this striking comparison between Gatsby and Jesus Christ to illuminate Gatsby’s creation of his own identity. Fitzgerald was probably influenced in drawing this parallel by a nineteenth-century book by Ernest Renan entitled The Life of Jesus. This book presents Jesus ...

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The Great Gatsby: Nick Carraway | SparkNotes

A detailed description and in-depth analysis of Nick Carraway in The Great Gatsby. Search all of SparkNotes Search. ... This inner conflict is symbolized throughout the book by Nick’s romantic affair with Jordan Baker. He is attracted to her vivacity and her sophistication just as he is repelled by her dishonesty and her lack of consideration ...

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The Great Gatsby: Full Book Quiz Quiz: Quick Quiz | SparkNotes

The Book Thief The Odyssey The Outsiders Menu. Shakespeare No Fear Shakespeare Translations; Shakespeare Study Guides; Shakespeare Life & Times ... The Great Gatsby SparkNotes Literature Guide Ace your assignments with our guide to The Great Gatsby! BUY NOW. Popular pages: The Great Gatsby. Chapter 1 ...

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The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald Plot Summary | LitCharts

Daisy invites Nick and Gatsby to lunch with her, Tom, and Jordan. During the lunch, Tom realizes Daisy and Gatsby are having an affair. He insists they all go to New York City. As soon as they gather at the Plaza Hotel, though, Tom and Gatsby get into an argument about Daisy. Gatsby tells Tom that Daisy never loved Tom and has only ever loved him.

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The Great Gatsby Chapter 9 Summary & Analysis | SparkNotes

Summary. Writing two years after Gatsby’s death, Nick describes the events that surrounded the funeral. Swarms of reporters, journalists, and gossipmongers descend on the mansion in the aftermath of the murder. Wild, untrue stories, more exaggerated than the rumors about Gatsby when he was throwing his parties, circulate about the nature of Gatsby’s relationship to Myrtle and Wilson.

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Frankenstein: Study Guide | SparkNotes

From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes Frankenstein Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays.

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The Great Gatsby Themes | LitCharts

The Great Gatsby portrays three different social classes: "old money" (Tom and Daisy Buchanan); "new money" (Gatsby); and a class that might be called "no money" (George and Myrtle Wilson). "Old money" families have fortunes dating from the 19th century or before, have built up powerful and influential social connections, and tend to hide their ...

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The Great Gatsby Quotes: Chapter 4 | SparkNotes

The Great Gatsby SparkNotes Literature Guide Ace your assignments with our guide to The Great Gatsby! BUY NOW. Popular pages: The Great Gatsby. Chapter 1 SUMMARY; Full Book Summary SUMMARY; Full Book Analysis SUMMARY; Jay Gatsby CHARACTERS; Themes LITERARY DEVICES; The American Dream QUOTES; Take a Study Break. Every Shakespeare Play Summed Up ...

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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: Full Book Summary - SparkNotes

The Book Thief The Great Gatsby Twelfth Night Menu. Shakespeare No Fear Shakespeare Translations; Shakespeare Study Guides; Shakespeare Life & Times; Glossary of Shakespeare Terms ... SparkNotes Plus subscription is $4.99/month or $24.99/year as selected above. The free trial period is the first 7 days of your subscription.

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Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland: Full Book Summary | SparkNotes

SparkNotes Plus subscription is $4.99/month or $24.99/year as selected above. The free trial period is the first 7 days of your subscription. ... Summary Full Book Summary. Alice sits on a riverbank on a warm summer day, drowsily reading over her sister’s shoulder, when she catches sight of a White Rabbit in a waistcoat running by her ...

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The Great Gatsby: Tom Buchanan Quotes | SparkNotes

Important quotes by Tom Buchanan in The Great Gatsby. Search all of SparkNotes Search. Suggestions. ... In Chapter 1, Tom tells Nick and Daisy about a book he recently read. The book, called “The Rise of the Colored Empires,” is based on a real work called “The Rising Tide of Color,” which purported to use scientific methods to justify ...

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An Inspector Calls: Study Guide | SparkNotes

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The Count of Monte Cristo: Character List | SparkNotes

Edmond Dantès and Aliases. Note: This SparkNote refers to Dantès by his given name through Chapter 30, after which it generally refers to him as Monte Cristo. Edmond Dantès. The protagonist of the novel. Dantès is an intelligent, honest, and loving man who turns bitter and vengeful after he is framed for a crime he does not commit.